It’s been a great week in reviews for MÉDICIS DAUGHTER!!!

First it made the Goodreads Best Books of the Month: December 2015 and I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. Then the love just kept on coming. You might even say Christmas came early for me:

a top ten for 2015, and I have no doubt I’ll be haunted by this one for a long while. ~Unabridged Chick

. . . this is a tale of overcoming obstacles and fighting for your place in the world. There is plenty of romance, drama, and political intrigue to keep even the most reluctant historical fiction reader entertained. ~Reading Lark

If you love historical fiction, or know someone that does, add this one to you Winter reading list- it’s perfect for curling up by the fire with! ~Bless Their Hearts Mom

I couldn’t put down. And when I wasn’t reading it, I was thinking about it. ~The Readers Hollow

Soaring, fascinating… this book has it all. ~Long and Short Reviews

It’s about time! Time to give the Tudors some competition. Time to show that the history of sixteenth century France is just as, if not more, gripping than that of Henry’s and Elizabeth’s England. In MÉDICIS DAUGHTER (St. Martin’s Press), Sophie Perinot rises to the challenge, offering a glimpse into the spectacular, turbulent years of the waning Valois dynasty. ~Writing the Renaissance

Rich with intrigue, rivalry and passion, Médicis Daughter is not to be missed. ~Flashlight Commentary

So, if you know someone who loves historical fiction, is sucked into dysfunctional family drama, or is fascinated by royal intrigue, Médicis Daughter might just make the perfect holiday gift!

chenonceau in the snow

Today’s review of THE SISTER QUEENS comes from a fellow historical writer, Julianne Douglas of  Writing the Renaissance. My favorite quote:

Congratulations to the author for finding a little-explored moment in history and bringing it to life for modern readers with verve, demonstrating how the bonds of sisterhood transcend not only distance, but time.”

They do indeed!

I am flattered that Julianne, a professor of literature, calls the novel:

an admirable debut, well-written and richly imagined, peopled with unique characters and simmering with conflict. Despite its length, the story never bogs down with unnecessary detail; the politics of thirteenth-centuryFranceandEnglandare sketched with just enough detail to support the dramatic action. The focus remains on the sisters’ relationship throughout, assuring thematic as well as structural cohesion.”

I hope you will venture over to Writing the Renaissance today and read the rest of her review.   Then stop by again tomorrow when I answer a series of questions generated by Julianne’s reading of the book.

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