Today’s review of THE SISTER QUEENS comes from a fellow historical writer, Julianne Douglas of  Writing the Renaissance. My favorite quote:

Congratulations to the author for finding a little-explored moment in history and bringing it to life for modern readers with verve, demonstrating how the bonds of sisterhood transcend not only distance, but time.”

They do indeed!

I am flattered that Julianne, a professor of literature, calls the novel:

an admirable debut, well-written and richly imagined, peopled with unique characters and simmering with conflict. Despite its length, the story never bogs down with unnecessary detail; the politics of thirteenth-centuryFranceandEnglandare sketched with just enough detail to support the dramatic action. The focus remains on the sisters’ relationship throughout, assuring thematic as well as structural cohesion.”

I hope you will venture over to Writing the Renaissance today and read the rest of her review.   Then stop by again tomorrow when I answer a series of questions generated by Julianne’s reading of the book.

By my count this lovely review of The Sister Queens from Kathy at Bags, Books & Bon Jovi marks the TWENTY-FIFTH on-line review received by the novel.  Twenty-five is a milestone.

I’d like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank each and every member of the virtual-world book community who took the time to read my debut and share their thoughts on it.  I am grateful.  I am humbled.  And in many cases I was very moved.

As for Kathy, she believes The Sister Queens would make a “fascinating choice” for book clubs and says:

There is just so much drama and intrigue and it can be told from so many perspectives… and reading such a novel told from two sisters’ points of view is refreshing and, honestly, a little unexpected. I did not realize, when I was offered this novel for review, that it would be such an intimate tale.”

If you have missed any of what has been said about The Sister Queens, the “Reviews” blog post category should bring up a complete (or nearly complete) list of links as well as some highlights.

The Sister Queens started their week at The Maiden’s Court where Heather enthused:

The pages of this read absolutely flew by at a pace much faster than my recent reads this year. This is a testimony to just how well written these characters were and how invested in their lives I became. You are simply sucked into all of the ups and downs that these women face.

Then, after stuffing themselves with four-week launch anniversary cupcakes (no, wait, that was me), the queens received “4 Willies” (can I just say I love that) at To Read or Not to Read, where Marcie said:

Perinot makes you care about these characters. She nailed the bond that only sister’s can have. The love, the jealousy, and also the deep friendship. This book was a page turner that I thoroughly enjoyed.”

Thank you ladies!  So glad you had The Sister Queens on your reading lists.  Hope your words will encourage others to add the novel to theirs.

Today Holly at Bippity Boppity Book shares her thoughts on The Sister Queens in a marvelous and very favorable review.  Holly says:

In Marguerite and Eleanor Sophie Perinot manages to create two characters who are polar opposites but equally interesting and believable.

And she will be:

recommending this to everyone I know who loves historical fiction and putting this author on my “buy immediately” list for her future releases.

 Thank you Holly!

And while The Sister Queens is enjoying the star treatment at Bippity Boppity, I am paying a visit to a castle—Tanzanite’s Castle Full of Books—where my hostess Daphne (besides excellent tea and crumpets) has some very insightful questions for me.  Stop by for a crumpet and find out how I became a writer and what drew me to the 13th century.

Finally, if you haven’t ordered your copy yet, both Holly and Daphne have copies to giveaway.

I end this penultimate week before my launch with a pair of reviews in blog-land.  The first at Dolce-Dolce and the second at Writer Writer Pants on Fire.  It is, I will admit, a balm for my pre-launch nerves to hear phrases like:

Kingly ambitions and sibling rivalry, love and lust all come into play between the pages, unfolding in a mesmerizing story about two Queens who were sisters above all else. 

and

The novel captures the nuances and intrigues of court life, as well as the excitement and danger of forbidden passions in the torrid Middle Eastfrom a fascinating feminine perspective.

spoken by people who are not my kith and kin.  Perhaps that bag I’ve prepared to wear over my head when I go to the grocery store will NOT be necessary.  At least this week.